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lulian:

The Yezidi Flag represents the Yezidi people and their struggle for freedom.The golden sun emblem at the center, is an ancient religious and cultural symbol among the Yezidis. Yezidi worshipers turn their face towards the sun for prayer.
Symbolism:Red symbolizes the blood of the countless Yezidi martyrs.White expresses peace and equality.Yellow represents the source of life and light of the people(Source: Wikipedia)

lulian:

The Yezidi Flag represents the Yezidi people and their struggle for freedom.

The golden sun emblem at the center, is an ancient religious and cultural symbol among the Yezidis. Yezidi worshipers turn their face towards the sun for prayer.


Symbolism:

Red symbolizes the blood of the countless Yezidi martyrs.
White expresses peace and equality.
Yellow represents the source of life and light of the people
(Source: Wikipedia)

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weecefwew:

A man stands dwarfed by several Yezidi temples in a village near Mosul in Iraq. The Yezidi are a mostly Kurdish-speaking people whose religion has long been mistakenly seen as having elements of devil worship.
Photo by: Stuart Freedman
The Yezidi are one of the more unique and mysterious religious minorities in the Middle East. They are a monotheistic faith who tend to keep to themselves, and are only allowed to marry within their religion which is why a Yezidi teenager was murdered in 2007 for having a Muslim boyfriend.
The belief that they worship Satan stems from the reverence they place upon Melek Taus, the angel which they believe was sent by God to rule over the earth. According to the Yezidi, Melek Taus was the leader of God’s archangels who was ordered to submit to Adam, only to disobey. Muslims believe that this same event occurred  only the angel, who they call Shaitan became Lucifer, whereas the the Yezidi believe that the order to bow to Man was merely a test and Melek Taus was given dominion over the earth as God’s representative as a reward for his refusal. The Yezidi faith actually has no real concept of  Satan, and instead dictates that the world is driven by the constant battle between good and evil within the soul of every human being. 
They pray five times a day, just like Muslims, only their prayers face the Sun instead of Mecca, with the exception of the Noon prayer, which faces the direction of the tomb of the religion’s central figure.
I’ve just really scratched the surface regarding what they believe, a better summary can be found in the people-group’s Wikipedia article, here. 

weecefwew:

A man stands dwarfed by several Yezidi temples in a village near Mosul in Iraq. The Yezidi are a mostly Kurdish-speaking people whose religion has long been mistakenly seen as having elements of devil worship.

Photo by: Stuart Freedman

The Yezidi are one of the more unique and mysterious religious minorities in the Middle East. They are a monotheistic faith who tend to keep to themselves, and are only allowed to marry within their religion which is why a Yezidi teenager was murdered in 2007 for having a Muslim boyfriend.

The belief that they worship Satan stems from the reverence they place upon Melek Taus, the angel which they believe was sent by God to rule over the earth. According to the Yezidi, Melek Taus was the leader of God’s archangels who was ordered to submit to Adam, only to disobey. Muslims believe that this same event occurred  only the angel, who they call Shaitan became Lucifer, whereas the the Yezidi believe that the order to bow to Man was merely a test and Melek Taus was given dominion over the earth as God’s representative as a reward for his refusal. The Yezidi faith actually has no real concept of  Satan, and instead dictates that the world is driven by the constant battle between good and evil within the soul of every human being. 

They pray five times a day, just like Muslims, only their prayers face the Sun instead of Mecca, with the exception of the Noon prayer, which faces the direction of the tomb of the religion’s central figure.

I’ve just really scratched the surface regarding what they believe, a better summary can be found in the people-group’s Wikipedia article, here

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chasing-rose:

Yezidi Kurds performing religious ceremony in their holy sanctuary, Lalesh in Southern Kurdistan. The ancient religion of our ancestors, children of the sun.

chasing-rose:

Yezidi Kurds performing religious ceremony in their holy sanctuary, Lalesh in Southern Kurdistan. The ancient religion of our ancestors, children of the sun.

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karduniash:

Dinanukt, the Half-Man Half-Book mythological character of the Mandean holy book, The Ginza Rba or “The Great Treasure”.
EDIT: Further research on this image has uncovered that the character’s identity is somewhat ambiguous, and the textual clues given in the image also point to it being a depiction of the lightworld hero Hibil Ziwa. The passages on the body are an abridged quotation from Prayer 79 of the Mandaean Prayer book:
"In the Name of the Great Life!
When the myrtle, the myrtle, flourished
In the gardens of Hibil;
When the wild marjoram grew in the precinct of the manda
They gave me two twigs of myrtle
From which they twisted a wreath for the jordan
For it is wonderful and fragrant it is perfume!”

karduniash:

Dinanukt, the Half-Man Half-Book mythological character of the Mandean holy book, The Ginza Rba or “The Great Treasure”.

EDIT: Further research on this image has uncovered that the character’s identity is somewhat ambiguous, and the textual clues given in the image also point to it being a depiction of the lightworld hero Hibil Ziwa. The passages on the body are an abridged quotation from Prayer 79 of the Mandaean Prayer book:

"In the Name of the Great Life!

When the myrtle, the myrtle, flourished

In the gardens of Hibil;

When the wild marjoram grew in the precinct of the manda

They gave me two twigs of myrtle

From which they twisted a wreath for the jordan

For it is wonderful and fragrant it is perfume!”

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"

For the Isma‘ili philosophers, the Crucifixion of Christ as a public event witnessed by a multitude holds a great symbolic and eschatological significance. As previously noted, Isma‘ili philosophy holds that God has sent six great Messengers, called Natiqs, to the world since the time of Adam. Each Natiq inaugurated a great ‘Cycle of Religion’ which lasted about one thousand years in which the Scripture and the religious law (shari’ah) consisting of the exoteric (zahir) rituals and commandments prescribed by the Natiq had authority over the people. The coming of a new Natiq ended one cycle and began a new one, abrogating the religious law of the previous Natiq. For example, the religious law prescribed by Noah was known as the Noachide laws, the law delivered by Moses was called the Torah or the Mosaic Law, and the law revealed by Muhammad is what Muslims refer to as Shari’ah in the formal sense.

All of the religious laws contain hidden, esoteric (batin) meanings pertaining to the eternal truths or realities (haqa‘iq) of spirituality which are common to all faiths and all human beings. The processing of disclosing the esoteric meaning of the religious law and unveiling the spiritual truths from its symbols and parables is called ta’wil. Each of the six Natiqs was accompanied by a dignitary called the Asas who was responsible for the ta’wil (esoteric interpretation) of the religious law. The Asas accompanying the first six Natiqs were Seth, Shem, Ishmael, Aaron, Simon Peter, and ‘Ali ibn Abi Talib. The Asas succeeded the Natiq and was himself succeeded by a series of Imams who continued both the functions of ta’wil and the interpretation of the religious law until the coming of the next Natiq.

After the six Cycles of the six Natiqs, the sixth being the Prophet Muhammad, still to come is the Seventh Natiq who is called the “Lord of the Resurrection” (Qa’im al- Qiyamah). He begins the Seventh Cycle which is the culmination of the previous six. Unlike the first six Natiqs, each of whom delivered a religious law, the function of the Lord of Resurrection or Qa’im is to reveal the esoteric (batin) and spiritual realities (haqa‘iq) hidden and symbolized by the religious laws. While the first six Natiqs were all lawgivers, the Lord of Resurrection is responsible for spiritual unveiling (kashf) and his Cycle is called the Cycle of Unveiling (dawr al-kashf) or the Cycle of Resurrection (dawr al-qiyamah). The first six cycles of the lawgiving Natiqs are compared to the first six days of the week while the Seventh Cycle of the Resurrection is likened to the Sabbath Day of rest and retribution.

"

Khalil Andani, “They Killed Him Not”: The Crucifixion in Shi‘a Isma‘ili Islam. (via fireofashk)

(via fireofashk-deactivated20140530)

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mohside:

Sabian Mandeans in Iraq by Samer M on Flickr.
A playful Sabian Mandaean child hides from the camera during a baptism ceremony in Baghdad. The Sabian Mandaeans face extinction as a people. Extremist groups in Iraq have persecuted Sabians, along with other minority groups, since 2003. Thousands from this small community have fled the country. Endemic to southern Iraq, the Sabian religion predates Christianity and promotes pacifism. Their central prophet is John the Baptist and they immerse themselves in flowing water as an act of ritual purity.

mohside:

Sabian Mandeans in Iraq by Samer M on Flickr.

A playful Sabian Mandaean child hides from the camera during a baptism ceremony in Baghdad.

The Sabian Mandaeans face extinction as a people. Extremist groups in Iraq have persecuted Sabians, along with other minority groups, since 2003. Thousands from this small community have fled the country. Endemic to southern Iraq, the Sabian religion predates Christianity and promotes pacifism. Their central prophet is John the Baptist and they immerse themselves in flowing water as an act of ritual purity.

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qalbesaleem:

A video of a semah, the ceremonial dance of Alevism, a syncretic religion found in Turkey with elements of Shi'ism, Sufism, and Anatolian folk beliefs.

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kchikurdi:

tomb of sheikh adi ibn musafir- holy place of the yezidis. lalish. southern kurdistan. 1981. [x]

kchikurdi:

tomb of sheikh adi ibn musafir- holy place of the yezidis. lalish. southern kurdistan. 1981. [x]

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jeannepompadour:

Druze woman wearing a tantour,Chouf in Lebanon,1870s

jeannepompadour:

Druze woman wearing a tantour,Chouf in Lebanon,1870s

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belledj:

The wedding of Prince Karim Aga Khan and Princess Salima, 1969.

belledj:

The wedding of Prince Karim Aga Khan and Princess Salima, 1969.